Bioshock Infinite 

released on Feb 26, 2013
Bioshock Infinite

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Bioshock Infinite 

released on Feb 26, 2013

This first-person story-driven shooter and entry in the Bioshock franchise follows Booker DeWitt as he enters the floating independent (formerly US) city of Columbia in 1912 and attempts to retrieve a girl trapped in a tower by the city's self-proclaimed despot/prophet in order to erase his financial debt. Throughout the story, themes of violence, racism and fatalism are brought up.


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A game that recklessly engages with the impossible through pure Spielbergian bombast, embodied as a cacophonous display of constantly moving variables. Unwieldy in its power and scope but undeniably contains some of the most breathtaking visual/aural spectacle ever devoted to the medium. Despite the Emporia section feeling mostly superfluous, this fixes Bioshock's drab third act dilemma and finds creative ways to open up its combat in a manner that feels intuitive and increasingly chaotic (despite some tiring enemy types). Those looking for concrete answers with its flimsy politics or consistency with its maze like plot logic may as well move on because Levine and his team are more fascinated with hose these thematic devices feed into the machinations of an indelibly romantic and contemplative blockbuster mold. It feels boundary pushing in every regard and its a shame its reputation has been diminished over the years. For every bit as brutally wonky and ostentatious as it is, it's just as much genuinely poignant with its fixation on gradual world building from beginning to end. For any misgivings I may have right now its pleasures feel like the stuff of dreams.


Presenta una ciudad igual de intrigante e interesante que Rapture, su problema recae en las pretensiones narrativas del mismo y basa su experiencia en un sistema de combate desenfrenado, acción bruta y un desafió pobre que se balancea con el uso de la protagonista como herramienta, en conjunto lo convierten en la peor experiencia de la saga y del medio.


This review contains spoilers

Most stressful "bring your daughter to work day" ever.


I'd sacrifice my own life for elizabeth and that's the only reason I'm giving it 5 stars


It is a shame that the abilities in this game serve more as crowd-control rather than delivering proper damage. The abilities are a lot more boring too. The game has less of an atmosphere compared to the past game. Also you loss money when you die which is pretty lame.


This review contains spoilers

A complete disappointment in story and gameplay both. The only positives I can really give this game are:

1) The visuals and overall presentation are pretty good.
2) The music is fine. It's nothing amazing, but it fits fine.

That's the end of my praises.

My gameplay gripes? Well, you can only hold two damn guns, and most of the plasmids vigors feel really samey, and the one or two more unique ones were so situational to the point where they never really got used. Compare to previous games, you had a ton of combat options in regards to plasmid and gun choice, this is so barren by comparison. I guess the Sky Hook is kinda cool? It feels so tacked on and gimmicky though, I almost never used the thing in combat except as a melee strike for enemies who got too close.

SPOILER WARNING
So, my ultimate gripe with this game is how it butchers the established story from the previous two games. The way it implements the Many-World Interpretation is just plain-fucking-wrong. Killing Booker at the end of the game, at a certain point in the """main""" timeline doesn't mean shit, because there's still an infinite number of parallel worlds. INFINITE, ENDLESS possible worlds, which means that there are MANY, MANY, MANY worlds where Booker DOESN'T accept being drowned at the end of the game and instead continues to live and become Comstock. This means the Comstock cycle never should actually end, but the game just brushes it all under a rug as if it does. Not only that, but MINUTES before the very end, Elizabeth herself is explaining the fucking Many Worlds Interpretation, and how there is an infinite number of similar but ultimately different worlds. But yet, the game goes "Yep, all the Bookers in all the multiverses of endless possibilities are all totally dead now...except ONE :^)." Burial At Sea was the most hamfisted, clunky, story retconning I've witnessed in a long-ass time. I'm entirely convinced that this game could have very easily been a non-Bioshock title and would have been almost no different. Hell, the Bioshock series and this game BOTH would've been better for it. Bioshock Infinite, on it's own, already sucked but Burial At Sea did more damage than the entire main game. Ken Levine can fuck right off with this nonsense.