Katamari Damacy

Katamari Damacy

released on Mar 18, 2004

Katamari Damacy

released on Mar 18, 2004

The King of All Cosmos accidentally destroyed the stars and—having recovered—wants the prince to rebuild them. Unfortunately the prince stands a little less than half a foot tall, so recreating the stars will require some effort. Enter the Katamari, a sphere the prince can push around our world to “roll up” items increasing the Katamari’s size until it’s suitable for the King. Taking place in stylized versions of Japanese houses, cities, and environs, the prince pushes the Katamari around collecting items which adhere to it. At first, the prince can only pick up smaller items, but as the Katamari grows, the more it can collect. Push pins and paper clips cling to the Katamari increasing its size so it can roll over obstacles and pick up bigger items. Over many levels, the Katamari can eventually pick up people, cars, and other bigger items. Players steer the Katamari from a third-person perspective using the analog sticks on the PS2. A tutorial stage takes the player through the controls and sets up the story as well as introducing a side story about a Japanese girl who can feel the cosmos. Wanting to challenge the prince, the King sets requirements on the Katamari’s size and sets time limits on the level. Bonus missions restore constellations and have their own restrictions. The world of Katamari Damacy is brought to life with off-beat animation and a catchy soundtrack. Players can find presents hidden in the levels that contain accessories for the prince. Two players can also battle head-to-head in a Katamari competition.


Also in series

Katamari Damacy Mobile
Katamari Damacy Mobile
Katamari Online
Katamari Online
Beautiful Katamari
Beautiful Katamari
Me & My Katamari
Me & My Katamari
We Love Katamari
We Love Katamari

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The story goes like this: Earth is captured by a technocapital singularity as renaissance rationalitization and oceanic navigation lock into commoditization take-off. Logistically accelerating techno-economic interactivity crumbles social order in auto-sophisticating machine runaway. As markets learn to manufacture intelligence, politics modernizes, upgrades paranoia, and tries to get a grip.

The body count climbs through a series of globewars. Emergent Planetary Commercium trashes the Holy Roman Empire, the Napoleonic Continental System, the Second and Third Reich, and the Soviet International, cranking-up world disorder through compressing phases. Deregulation and the state arms-race each other into cyberspace.

By the time soft-engineering slithers out of its box into yours, human security is lurching into crisis. Cloning, lateral genodata transfer, transversal replication, and cyberotics, flood in amongst a relapse onto bacterial sex.

Neo-China arrives from the future.

Hypersynthetic drugs click into digital voodoo.

Retro-disease.

Nanospasm.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Av5YeL-RrVA

Part of me wants to say Katamari Damacy is more charming than it is a good game, but even if I never actually got used to the weird way it controls, I don't think that ever really got in the way as I played it. Although, it might explain why I've listened to the soundtrack and watched the game on YouTube a bunch, but have never really gone back to play it. I should probably do that.

What Katamari Damacy giveth, it also taketh away.
Hurtling through its dioramas is hampered by controls that betray.

Its rapturous simplicity incites one to engage and relax.
That is until The King obscures the screen with vexing verbal attacks.

The technical wizardry on display, I haven’t the faintest idea how.
I’m similarly stupefied when a vending machine or traffic cone is classified a cow.

The game’s excellent soundtrack is composed of aptly quirky tunes.
But even they can begin to grate as the repetition balloons.

Katamari’s uniqueness is still unmatched, its handful of sequels aside.
But occasional exasperation and frustration, it demands you abide.

Scientific proof that quite literally anything can be gamified. What an absolute treat of novel game design, who knew rolling up stuff could be so satisfying? Of course the game's eccentric personality and killer OST also serve to make the game one-of-a-kind, but man I just can't get over how much I like to roll stuff up.

Charming as all hell, this is one of those games you can blow through in an afternoon and have a huge grin on your face the whole time. Fantastic stuff