The Last of Us Part II

released on Jun 19, 2020

Set 5 years after the events of The Last of Us, we see the return of Joel and Ellie. Driven by hatred, Ellie sets out for Seattle to serve justice. However, she begins to wonder what justice really means.


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This is the best game of all time I genuinely think if you rate it anything lower than a 7 or an 8 then you didn't get the point. (You're allowed to dock points for pacing but I'm not because I can't think of a way they could've done it better myself) It also WASHES everything else that has ever come out in terms of actual technical aspects


Es muy valiente por parte de Naughty Dog dedicar la mitad de un juego a convencerte de que su protagonista es basura y de que su antagonista, además de basura, también es persona. Me parece una jugada arriesgada y que funciona sorprendentemente bien al hacerte vivir de primera mano las dos perspectivas.

Jugablemente es un avance significativo respecto al primero: todo está más pulido, es más agradable y mucho más dinámico y satisfactorio. Lo cual tiene la parte negativa de que la violencia de este juego es TAN divertida que choca con el mensaje de "la violencia no lleva a nada" que quiere dar el juego.

Es una historia de personas horribles tomando decisiones horribles y arruinando su vida y las de todos los que les rodean por no pararse un par de minutos a pensar en lo imbéciles que están siendo. Y entiendo que produzca rechazo, pero a mí me ha resultado bastante interesante.

Es un muy buen juego y la única pega que le puedo poner es que quizá es demasiado largo y que su jugabilidad no casa del todo bien con el mensaje que quiere dar. Por lo demás, me quito el sombrero.

De algo ha tenido que servir el crunch de Naughty Dog, ¿no?

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It's really brave on Naughty Dog's part to dedicate half a game to convince you its star is trash and its antagonist, besides being trash, is also a person. I think it's a risky gamble and it works surprisingly well by making you live both perspectives firsthand.

Gameplay-wise it's a massive improvement over the first one: everything's more polished, nicer and much more dynamic and satisfying. Which has the drawback that violence in this game is SO fun it clashes with the "violence doesn't fix anything" the game is trying to push.

It's a story about awful people making awful choices and ruining their and everyone else's lives just because they couldn't stop to think about how dumb they were being. And I understand some people may dislike that, but I found it quite interesting.

It's a great game and the only thing I can complain about is it's maybe a bit too long and its gameplay doesn't quite fit with its message. Other than that, hats off.

All the crunch at Naughty Dog had to have been for something, right?


this game stole game of the year from ghost of tsushima if you have even a single brain cell you can tell how bad this game is


Without a doubt one of my greatest and most impactful video game experience. Still can't replay it, since playing it can almost feel traumatic. Beautiful but dreadful story, told through one of the most technically beautiful game ever.


Oh, how the mighty have fallen. For three console generations, Naughty Dog established themselves as frontrunners of both ground-breaking technical achievements and cinematic mastery. However, while The Last of Us made quite the splash when it dropped towards the end of the PS3’s life, the praise it received was largely directed towards its story and graphics, NOT gameplay.

Riding the tail end of the “zombie survival” trend, The Last of Us earned a slew of praise, and a mountain of awards, in large part due to Naughty Dog's attention to detail: through subtle world building and visual storytelling, they delivered an affecting character drama set against the backdrop of a gritty, depressing world that made everyone feel like shit. In other words: it was the vidya-equivalent of Oscar bait.

Seven years later, however, Neil Druckmann managed to go a step beyond making us feel just how horrible their world was by… making us feel just how horrible their world was. Just, you know, in a different, unintended way. In the end of this 25-hour slog of self-induced misery, Druckmann’s penchant for torture porn really put the player in quite an uncomfortable position, one that could only have been even more awkward for the developers who had to sit there recreating the company-mandated Liveleak gore videos he probably emailed around the office. “Check out this manga,” Neil probably texted the mocap director, who had been awake for 35 hours at that point, “at the end, a dude puts her baby in a blender lmao.”

While The Last of Us as a series has never really been defined by its gameplay, at least the sequel has a solid story and well-written characters to fall back on, right? Well, what do you get when you take a game with mediocre gameplay and a great story and strip away the story while simultaneously taking a dump all over the original? You get… this. A game that sits you down and shovels an entire day of misery down your throat with no payoff. A game that goes out of its way to destroy the main appeal of its predecessor. A game that sets up the most hateable character imaginable, and then forces you into her shoes for the next ten hours. A game that revels in making you do horrible things and then chastises you for doing them. A game that /v/ voted the most hated game of 2020.

So to Neil and his three remaining employees, good job. Add this award to your pile, you didn’t even have to pay for this one.