Twelve Minutes

Twelve Minutes

released on Aug 19, 2021

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Twelve Minutes

released on Aug 19, 2021

A romantic evening with your wife turns into a violent invasion, as a man breaks into your home, accuses your wife of murder and beats you to death. Only for you to wake up and find yourself stuck in a twelve-minute time loop, doomed to relive the same terror again and again.


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He leído todo tipo de críticas negativas hacia Twelve Minutes, y aunque las entiendo, mi experiencia estuvo más basada en la resolución del 'puzzle' que en la de buscar una experiencia inmersiva, o una coherencia narrativa. Mucho más divertido si lo juegas con alguien.


This review contains spoilers

a incest flim disguised as a A story game.


Pretentious wank. Dicitonary definition of it. When you drop your amazing twist, maybe check to see if your players burst out laughing.

Starts out promising enough with a funny if muddled and frankly borderline broken escape room-esque game where you try and put item A into slot B to continue things but when it actually tries to tell a story it completely falls apart. Hollywood talent can't save that, especially when your main stars, both from the UK, are forced behind American accents for some reason.

Stuff like this is why I don't play 'narrative' games for the most part - because this is the kind of garbage I think is waiting for me.


This review contains spoilers

Está na minha lista dos top 10 incesto lugar


In Twelve Minutes we play a crime and mystery story, accompanied by a time loop that serves as the main game mechanic, which will help us to reveal the story and its mysteries.

As the loops go by, a very crude story unravels, having very interesting plot twists; being the ending a total 180 degree turn for the story.

About the gameplay, it has very interactive point and click gameplay, being able to interact with many objects in order to play with the environment and advance the story, in addition to the fact that the characters tend to react to various things, giving us incentives to look up for more interactions with the objects and characters.

Despite the fact that the game has a lot of replayability possibilities to advance and inquire more in the story, the biggest problem in the game comes when doing it is totally tedious, due to the poorly made animations, being slow, rough and bugged, this added to the long conversations that the characters repeat and repeat in each loop without the possibility of skipping it, but only being able to do them a little faster, making it tiring to have to repeat the same actions over and over again .

In conclusion, Twelve Minutes is a story with a main mechanic that has potential, but in technical aspects it must be polished more in order to make its replayability more smooth and enjoyable.


This review contains spoilers

I thought after all the time loop games I've played I'd get a kick out of finessing the loop which others found repetitive. In many other similar games the discoveries you make allow you to optimise and speed up the opening minutes of a new loop and get to the new stuff you want to explore within the time constraints. However, Twelve Minutes instead relies far too much on 'temporal backtracking', where you constantly have to go through sequences you'd thought you were already done with again to check whether a new line of dialogue has opened up that can help you progress (if you're lucky - there are a lot of dead ends here too!) Having to repeat a few fiddly actions in order to prime for a specific sequence just so you can try a vague idea you have got pretty tiresome.

Also, they pretentiously liken their game to 'Rear Window' and 'The Shining' in the marketing material (along with just straight up using the iconic carpet from the latter - nice and subtle) but the twist is just a ripoff of Oldboy albeit significantly less fun.