Doom

released on Dec 10, 1993

In the future, humans have left Earth and settled throughout the galaxy. On Mars, the Union Aerospace Corporation has established a radioactive waste facility and allowed the military to conduct teleportation experiments on the nearby moons of Deimos and Phobos. Hours ago, the base on Mars began receiving incoherent distress messages from Phobos, while Deimos has disappeared completely. With all attempts to establish contact failing, you and your team have been dispatched to investigate. Upon arrival, you secure the perimeter as the rest of your team enters the facility. As you stand guard, your radio crackles with the sound of gunfire, cracking bones and blood-curdling screams and eventually falls silent. Alone, with no way off the planet or means to defend yourself other than your trusty pistol, there’s only one way out - into the complex of death and the horrors that await you within. If you plan to get out of here alive you must fend off the hordes of demonic imps, haunting spectres and your undead, former comrades waiting to tear you limb from limb. So, grab the nearest shotgun and blast your way out of this fragging madness!


Also in series

Doom 3: Resurrection of Evil
Doom 3: Resurrection of Evil
Doom 3
Doom 3
Doom 64
Doom 64
Master Levels for Doom II
Master Levels for Doom II
Doom II: Hell on Earth
Doom II: Hell on Earth

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I've never been a huge FPS fan, probably from too many experiences of being absolutely demolished whenever I would go over to a friend's place to play COD or Halo. I have an ethical critique about the psychological numbing effect of immersive mass murder that probably just masks the fact that I'm not very good at them. There's something about the 360 degree aiming around everywhere that I always found a little nauseating, especially when coupled with always seemingly being sniped by someone in a blind spot I never even knew existed.

Meanwhile, Doom has a very "primitive" control scheme which limits cursor movement to 1 dimension. While this feels very weird at first, especially I assume to those really used to how modern FPS games control, the minimalist approach actually worked really well for me. Combined with the fantastical theme of the game, it elides "realism" in favor of simple berserker power fantasy. That being said, there is a lot of clever strategy involved, especially considering the low number of enemies- they all have distinct but simple attack behaviors that make it easy to remix new situations based on the combinations of enemies and level design. Sometimes the practice of going around collecting keys and finding secrets can be a little frustrating, but not nearly as much as I expected. At the end of the day, this game is a rush and simply feels really, really good to play.

é um bom jogo, pra época ele é interessante como sendo um dos primeiros shooters bons
vale a pena

Still fun to this day.


Thank you for making house.wad possible.

I had an immense amount of fun with Doom (1993), but it's not without its flaws. While I can overlook aspects that seem dated today, like the simplistic graphics, there are certain issues that even in 1993 would have drawn criticism from me.

Firstly, the inconsistency in difficulty is a notable problem. I don't mean the expected progression where each level gets harder, but rather the unpredictable spikes where some levels are surprisingly easy, and the next are extremely challenging, only to become easy again. This erratic difficulty curve can be quite jarring.

The absence of map markers exacerbates orientation problems in certain levels, particularly those with teleporters or door switches. It doesn't mean I need explicit map markers, but some levels fail to provide the necessary information for navigation through their design. It becomes extremely frustrating in maps where teleporters change their spawn points based on the entry point, leading to significant confusion and disorientation.

The boss fights are a mixed bag. While the first and second boss fights are thrilling and well-executed, the third and fourth fall flat in comparison. Additionally, the mechanic where dying in an episode run resets you to the beginning of the level with only a pistol, despite having accumulated a full arsenal, is particularly annoying and disrupts the flow of the game.

On the positive side, the soundtrack is fantastic and truly enhances the gaming experience, providing an adrenaline-pumping backdrop to the intense action. The levels in Episode 1 are well-designed and engaging, showcasing the game’s strengths. However, some of the later levels feel haphazard, resembling amateur mod maps, like those in Garry's Mod, where structures seem randomly placed without cohesive design.

In conclusion, Doom (1993) is a good game that offers a lot of enjoyment, but it also has its share of frustrations. Despite its historical significance and initial fun, the game's inconsistencies and design flaws make it unlikely that I will replay it.